Beginner Moonkin Eclipse Strategies

The new Eclipse mechanic is confusing a lot of druids. While Lore made a great intro video, some of the timing and advice is above what brand new moonkin druids can do. So, we’ll cover the general new player strategy below. If you are an advanced player, you should move directly to the guides written by Cyous.

Once upon a time, I was falling in love (with moonkin), but now I’m only falling apart. There’s nothing I can do. A Total Eclipse of the Heart.

What is Eclipse?

Illustration of the Eclipse power bar

Eclipse is the most difficult mechanic to learn as a moonkin. Eclipse puts a bar under your name-plate (if you are using the default User Interface, without any addons). You get Eclipse at level 10, so you can start learning the mechanic early. Do not ignore Eclipse! There is a new Eclipse version again this expansion.

When you start combat, the new version of Eclipse makes the bar automatically swing back and forth, even if you aren’t casting anything. It starts out heading towards the moon (Lunar Eclipse) side. The closer you are to the moon (Lunar Eclipse), the more damage your Arcane spells (e.g., Starfire and Moonfire) do.

When Eclipse crosses into the yellow Sun side (Solar Eclipse) at the zero balance power mid-point, your moonfire turns into Sunfire. Sunfire does nature damage (instead of arcane damage). The closer you are to the sun (Solar Eclipse), the more damage your nature spells (e.g., wrath and sunfire) do.

Are there addons to make playing moonkin easier?

Yes! The most recent patch broke every previous addon tool everyone used to manage their Eclipse rotation. At this point, Cyous has made a tool using Weak Auras 2 for managing the new Eclipse rotation. This helps you with timing Eclipse for more optimal play. If you plan to raid at end-game with your druid, you want to get the Weak Auras 2 build that Cyous put together.

What do you cast in Lunar Phase as a new druid?

  • Moonfire: This is a Damage over Time spell. You want this DOT on your target to tick over time. In the most simple rotation, you can always just cast this once every time you enter a new Lunar Eclipse phase (or refresh it at any point during the lunar phase). NOTE: While you get double-damage to the instant damage from moonfire/sunfire in the ‘peak’ Eclipse, the DOT isn’t impacted by this extra buff. Instead, the DOT dynamically updates every tick. Thus, maintaining high DOT up-time is the first step in learning the rotation (e.g., more ticks is more damage; regardless of when you cast moonfire).
  • Starsurge: This is spell has three charges. The simplest time to cast this is at the start of a new Lunar phase. When you cast starsurge, it buffs the damage of your next two Starfire spells. Avoid casting starsurge when you are about to leave the Lunar Phase (otherwise, you can usually fit in one or two starsurges per cycle).
  • Starfire is the main ‘filler’ spell you cast during Lunar Phase.
  • Beginner Lunar rotation Summary: Moonfire -> Starsurge -> Cast a bunch of starfires -> Swap to Solar phase at the zero midpoint.

What do you cast in Solar Phase as a new druid?

  • Sunfire: This is another DOT. You want this DOT on your target to tick over time. In the most simple rotation, you can always just cast this once every time you enter a new Solar Eclipse phase (or refresh it at any point in the solar phase). This shares the same mechanics as moonfire.
  • Starsurge: The simplest time to cast this is at the start of a new Solar phase. When you cast starsurge, it now buffs your next three wrath spells in this phase. Avoid casting starsurge when you are about to leave the Solar Phase.
  • Wrath is your main ‘filler’ spell you cast during Solar Phase.
  • Beginner Solar rotation Summary: Sunfire -> Starsurge -> Cast a bunch of wraths-> Swap to Solar Phase at the zero midpoint.

Can I just spam moonfire all the time?

No, learning at least the very basic lunar vs solar distinction is helpful for building the foundation for learning the rotation. Also, now that moonfire turns into sunfire, you only have access to moonfire half the time, anyway. So, everyone who just spammed moonfire should learn the basic rotation described above for alternating lunar and solar phases. However, moonfire spam can be useful for movement. Keep in mind that the DOT updates dynamically with spell power buffs and such, so that the timing is more forgiving.

What are the more advanced rotation decisions?

Happy 6.0 Warlords of Draenor patch day!

The 6.0 pre-patch with all the class and systems changes goes live today! Here are some resources for surviving patch day! Returning to the game after a break, or haven’t been following all the dozens of changes? No problem! Below are some helpful links for druids (with a couple bonus mage guides!). I’ll add more resources as they become available – many people are working on finishing & publishing their guides today. For example, wowhead is still working on finishing up their class guides today.

General Druid Changes:

Restoration druids:

Balance Druids:

 Guardian Druids:

Feral Druids:

Frost Mages:

Blizzard’s Beginner Balance Druid video:

Resto druid WOD level 90 survival guide 6.0

Below is a summary of relevant Warlords of Draenor changes for restoration druids. This information is relevant to level 90 after the 6.0 patch. The patch is still at least a week away, but I wanted to get this posted for people to start preparing early! The below information is (to the best of my knowledge) accurate at the time of posting. Future updates will be done as needed. I will be updating the full healing guide at a later date to be relevant for level 100 closer to the expansion launch. Keep in mind that my advice for level 100 will vary greatly from what is posted below, as many level 100 decisions are not relevant for the month we are 90 or the time we spend leveling from 90 to 99. As usual, everything is still subject to change between now and when the patch goes live. Hamlet already has a level 100 druid guide up on WOWhead. In addition, my level 100 druid guide is now updated!

Major Stat Changes

Stat Squish: All the stats have been squished! All player and NPC health, damage, heals, stats, and other values have been reduced. This means that the time to kill something remains relatively constant, but the numbers shown on the screen are smaller.
• There is no reforging – what stats you have on your gear is what you get (and all previous reforging was reversed).
Spirit is now only found on accessories and not your primary gear (hit for DPS casters was removed entirely). Thus, healers and DPS casters now largely share all gear, with the exception of a few accessories with spirit. This means all your gear, gems, and such were changed to remove spirit.
• They made major HOT mechanic changes. Thus, there are no Haste HOT Breakpoints anymore (so, don’t ask for one). In addition, you can recast HOTs any time in the last 30% of the duration and not suffer any loss of ticks, so you get a little more wiggle room for refreshing HOTs without penalty. Instead of snapshotting stats, most HOTs and DOTs now update dynamically each tick.
Major stats at level 90. Most of your gear will have crit, mastery, and haste on it. Resto druids generally prefer mastery and haste over crit, but most of your gear resto tier gear will have crit on it. For the month we are all level 90, these stats aren’t terribly important for most of what you want to do, so most gear will be fine.
The other new stats (versatility, multistrike, etc) will be introduced to gear in the expansion once we start leveling and replacing gear in Draenor, and will be talked about in the level 100 guide coming “soon”.

Gearing at 90 (Summary): Accessories (e.g., neck, ring) with spirit will be better than accessories without. On your main gear (e.g., chest, pants, boots, etc), mastery and haste are prioritized higher than crit. You can’t reforge, however, so gearing optimally isn’t important for the month we wait for the next expansion. Wowhead has a gearing up guide if you need more gearing up advice (or more advice about the stat changes). Note that tiny differences in things like “optimal” enchants and consumables won’t have any real measurable effect on your performance for the month you are 90 (and are subject to change over the course of that month).

Major Changes to Abilities

Lifebloom is now limited to a single stack, instead of having 3 total stacks. The base healing was increased to compensate. This frees up more time in the fight, and means that sometimes you might want to let lifeboom actually bloom for the direct heal.
Wild Mushroom no longer has a bloom direct heal effect. Instead, it just provides a short Efflorescence ground-targeted HOT and then goes away after the 30 second duration ends. While it has no cooldown, only one can be on the ground at a time. So, as this is mana-expensive to move around, only move it if you have to.
• Swiftmend can no longer have efflo attached to it, so it only provides the instant single-target direct heal.
• Wild Growth has a cast time, but resto druids still maintain a fair amount of movement ability while healing overall.

Minor Changes to Abilities

• Omen of Clarity only benefits regrowth, and no longer gains additional procs from the Tree of Life form cooldown.
• Tranquility’s mechanic has been simplified, but it otherwise works the same in practice. It’s a powerful channeled spell that heals all nearby party/raid members over 8 seconds, with a 3 minute cooldown (no more additional HOT component or strange scaling).
Level 90 talents no longer provide a strong main-role bonus, but Nature’s Vigil seems to be the best one for resto druids.
• They changed the combat res mechanic for raids. In a raid, your combat res ability will show the number of the shared pool of charges remaining for the boss encounter across all raid/party members. In a 20-person raid, we get 1 charge every (90/20 =) 4.5 minutes, or one charge every (90/10 =) 9 minutes in a 10-person raid.

Removed Abilities

The following abilities were removed from resto druids’ toolset:

• Nourish
• Symbiosis
• Innervate
• Hybernate
• Nature’s Grasp
• Some hybrid bear/cat abilities were removed from resto druids, including: Faerie Fire, lacerate, maim, (mangle is now bear only – with shred no longer having a positional requirement for cat), maul, might of ursoc, rake, survival instincts, etc.

What are the primary healing tools?

Single target direct: Healing Touch (long cast time), Regrowth (high mana cost), Swiftmend (instant-cast, but has a cooldown and requires a HOT on the target), nature’s swiftness (paired with healing touch).
• Single target HOTS: Lifebloom (1 stack, still limited to 1 target), Rejuvenation (mana cost similar to healing touch)
AOE HOTs: Wild Growth (1.5 sec cast time, 8 sec cooldown, 7 sec duration), Wild Mushroom (instant-cast, 30 sec duration, ground-targeted), Tranquility (channeled for 8 sec, 3 min cooldown), Genesis (high mana cost, emergency heal, consumes all your rejuvs and applies that HOT healing faster).
• Important Passive Procs: Living seed (procs from Healing touch, regrowth, or swiftmend crits – got slightly better), omen of clarity (only impacts regrowth).
• Other: level 15 talents and level 60 talents provide new healing spells or augments.

What are the primary utility tools?

Crowd control: roots, cyclone, choice of level 45 talents, and choice of level 75 talents.
Movement: Dash, travel form, level 15 talents, stampeding roar
Survivability: Ironbark (yourself or others) and barkskin (yourself only)
• Other spells: rebirth, revive, nature’s cure, Mark of the Wild, Teleport: Moonglade

How am I supposed to heal raids (summary)?

The healing strategy stays largely the same. Keep Lifebloom on a single tank. Use rejuv on as many targets as possible. Use Wild Growth on cooldown. Cast Wild Mushroom once every 30 seconds, or when everyone has moved out of it. Use Swiftmend as an instant single-target heal. Use regrowth when omen of clarity procs. Use Healing Touch if you need a big direct heal. Use tranquility as needed for big burst damage phases. Use other utility (e.g., ironbark, nature’s cure, rebirth) as needed.

What talents changed? What talents should I take?

  • For level 90 (and leveling to 100), take the talents you are most comfortable with. I generally prefer passive talents over active talents for leveling.
  • The only major functionality changes are to Soul of the Forest (now provides HOTs and regrowth with a healing bonus instead of haste – still makes HT cast faster), Heart of the Wild (no longer provides strong intellect bonus), and Incarnation (they changed what spells are augmented, and so now you spam rejuv instead of lifebloom/regrowth).
  • Everything else is largely number tuning and reducing the main-role bonus from the other level 90 talents (DOC & NV) to be slightly weaker relative to the health pool changes.
  • So, a build for a player new to resto druids leveling in dungeons could be: Feline Swiftness, Ysera’s Gift, Typhoon, Soul of the Forest, Ursol’s Vortex, and Nature’s Vigil.
  • More experienced druids might take incarnation  instead of force of nature to have a cooldown that can be timed with end-game boss encounters.
  • Note that end-game raiding builds will end up with different talents that better suit the needs of the raid encounters or play-styles, especially given how the level 100 talents interact with the rest of the builds.

What’s up with my travel form button?

Travel form has merged the ground travel, water travel, and flight form all into one single button that is supposed to morph when you change environments. The Glyph of Stag will split Flight Form from this merged travel form (in addition to letting party members ride on your back). However, the “travel form” will still go into the swim/water form even when someone is on your back. So, if you are carrying someone on your back in stag form, don’t go in water or you will drop them!

“My new face is ugly!”

You can now have plastic surgery done to your character’s face by visiting the barber shop.

What race should I be?

The new racial trait info can be found here.

What glyphs should I use?

Note that the Efflorescence and innervate glyphs were removed. If this is still in your talent page, remove it – it does nothing. You can take any of the glyphs designed for resto druids that are helpful at 90 and leveling to 100. Generally keep the ones you were using before, and update any removed glyphs with new options that augment spells you are using. For more glyph advice, see the level 100 healing guides.

Learning League of Legends

Even with Beta to help keep me occupied with WOW’s 12+ months of no new content, I’ve still been seeking out other games to occupy my time. Thus, for the last few months, I have been working on learning League of Legends. At this point, I’ve played a whole 2 PVP games, and have otherwise been spending most of my time in the “bot” game mode (co-op vs AI). Thus, today, my goal is to talk about Learning the game. I have run into a lot of people in the Bot games who don’t know the basic strategies of what they need to be successful in the Bot games. So, below are my tips for new players along with descriptions of my own experiences in learning the game.

Tip #1 – After the tutorials, play lots of “Intro Bot” games

IntroBots

LOL has two tutorials (a basic tutorial and a battle training tutorial). You can repeat these tutorials a couple of times to get used to the basic feel of the game. However, most of the learning is going to occur while playing the Intro Difficulty in your Summoner’s Rift map co-op vs AI games. This new Intro difficulty is a repeatable and relatively safe place to learn about the game until you hit level 10 (see the news release on why they released this new difficulty). If you previously quit trying to play LOL because of how hard it was to learn the game, this is an opportunity to come back and try again.

The benefits of Intro Bots over Beginner Bots:

  • Intro bots gives you some time to farm minion kills in your lane before you will be harassed by the other team’s bots. This allows you to get a lot of gold via killing the other team’s minions.
  • The item store is a little simpler, giving you time to learn how to build items. The delay of the bots coming out also gives you time to explore the item store more to plan your item buys.
  • The bots are tuned to be easier to play against: They don’t build as many awesome items, and they don’t react as fast when using their abilities.
  • If you make mistakes while trying to learn, it often won’t hurt your team all that much. With a lot of people playing alt (“Smurf”) accounts, this difficulty level will result in winning more often, reinforcing your play time with rewards.

Tip # 2: Turrets are deadly killing machines – know when to retreat

If the turret isn't shooting a minion, it will melt your face off.

If the turret isn’t shooting a minion, it will melt your face off.

Even in the bot games, the bots know to stay out of range of your turrets. However, many of the other players seem to just dive right into the turret and get their faces melted off. You want the turret to be shooting at minions, not your face. So, never be in range of the enemy’s turret unless your minions are protecting you and taking all the hits. In general, staying behind minions all the time is a good idea. It is far better to lose some minions than have your face melted. The intro bots turret doesn’t hit quite as hard as other game modes, but treat the turrets like lava – only go into turret range to kill the turret when you have minions to protect you.

If you are standing in the enemy’s turret and you shoot at one of your enemies, the turret will aggro on you and kill you. So, knowing when to fall back from the enemy turret is the most important thing to know. I spent a lot of time learning how to run away and save myself from death, and I had a lot of early deaths via turrets because I wouldn’t pay enough attention to my surroundings. Whatever you do, do not stand in the turret if there are not minions in the turret with you.

However, bots often won’t chase you into your own turrets. So, you can escape from the bots by retreating into the safety range of your team’s turrets. In the easier bot game difficulties, the bushes also tend to drop aggro from some of the bots. Learning when to disengage from a battle and run away was the most important skill of all. The game can go bad very fast if you “Feed” the bots by repeatedly dying. Staying alive is more important than getting a kill. Don’t leave the Intro Bots difficulty until you’ve learned how to minimize your time spent getting hit by turrets – because the turrets in beginner bots will melt your face.

Tip # 3: Maximize your use of items

Item_Sets_Custom

Another rookie mistake (in addition to death by turret) is in not maximizing the use of items. Just like wearing agility gear on a restoration druid is going to make your life much more difficult in WOW, itemization for your LOL character matters. Every time you get the killing blow on a minion or bot, you earn gold. Your team also earns gold from completing objectives (e.g., killing turrets, killing mobs in the jungle, etc). In general, there is a “right” way to spend your gold, and very many “Wrong” ways to spend your gold. Many items have “Unique” effect items – which means that two of them won’t stack. So, you only want to buy one of each item. The biggest rookie mistake of itemization is buying more than one of the same thing, so be careful not to duplicate the same “unique” effects and waste gold.

Intro bot learning supports will help you with choosing items. It gives you recommended gear pages that help you in building item sets that are (mostly) appropriate. As you learn the game, it still helps to know the “optimal” gearing via reading guides about the champions from various fansites. You want to buy items that will help you the most. You can also make custom gear sets, on your summoner profile page. I have saved item sets to help me more easily buy things on my characters that I frequently play. I chose the items based on reading guides on sites like Lolking that told me what items were “best”.

Keep in mind that you can buy cheaper components to build into end-game items, so spend gold early on the components you want to work on building – and then upgrade those to the complete end product as you get more gold.

 Tip #4: Intro Bots are predictable – Know your champion and lane setups

Summoners Rift has three lanes, referred to as: Top, Mid, and Bot. The setup for all Bot games are different than the traditional PVP roles. So, in learning Bot games, there are specific setups from the bots you should be aware of:

  • Top lane has two bots. These are usually fighter and/or tank roles (often using attack power and defensive stats). So, two people in beginner bots typically go to cover the top lane (with the exception that some people try “jungle” practice – see below Jungle note). Champions such as Garen make for easy top lane picks. Other top lane champion examples: Teemo, renekton, Leona, and Gangplank.
  • Mid lane has one bot. This is typically a ranged spell caster (Ability Power – AP). So, you should have one person playing a caster (AP mid) on this lane. Ryze is often considered easy, but I found that Ryze tended to be the bot we had to fight against (and I could lose in a Ryze vs Ryze fight early in learning the game). To counter Ryze-bot, Malzahar is my current favorite for doing beginner and intermediate-level bot games, since his ultimate plus all his ticking DOTs end up being really strong. Other mid-lane options include: Ziggs, Lissandra, Morgana, Lux, etc.
  • Bottom lane has two bots. This typically includes one ranged (Attack Damage Carry), and one support bot. Choosing ranged and/or support bots for the bottom lane works the best. Options for the AD Carry include: Ashe, Miss Fortune, Caitlyn, and Sivir. Supports are typically characters with both damage and utility (or healing) abilities. I found Soraka to be a good starting support, since I could dish out some damage while also having healing abilities. Other supports include: Jana, Annie (who can also play mid),
  • Bots don’t do “Jungle” roles. In PVP, someone takes the role of Jungle (e.g., instead of going top lane, one player floats around the middle of the map, killing monster objectives and helping to gank people in lanes). While some people will practice jungle in bot games, new players should avoid learning about jungle roles until you get more experienced at the game. Since bots don’t ever go jungle, the PVP setup is different than what you learn in the bot games.

Some other general notes: For intro bot games, we tend to push pretty far before the bots make any traction. However, for beginner and intermediate difficulty, knowing the bot late-game strategy is helpful. After killing enough turrets (especially in harder bot difficulties), the bots tend to stick together more often. This means that after their “end of lane phase” is triggered, the bots will usually group up together. So, when you see bots abandoning their otherwise assigned lanes, you should lend more support to your team. The bots will also choose to defend their base when it is being threatened, meaning that if you are doing really well in a lane, you can expect more bots to come target you.

For learning more about the champions, you can use the free champion rotation to try out champions before you buy them (either with real money, or points you earn). I’d suggest eventually buying at least one champion you like to play for each role (so that you can have a static set of characters you play across weeks). With so many options to choose from, finding characters you like is better than playing the ones that high-end players think are “best” (often, the best high-end characters make the worst ones to start with to learn anyway). Use guides on sites like Lolking (e.g. the “wowhead” of League of legends) to help you learn more about the champions, their itemization, skills, and such. In the end, practice is the only way to get better in the game – make sure that you play the same few champions (I recommend one for each lane – to be somewhat flexible in your group picks) until you get comfortable with how to play the game.

Tip #5: Play nice and communicate with your team

This is a game, and you are supposed to be having fun. Yelling and cursing at people who are trying to learn the game is particularly unhelpful. When you are on the champion selection screen, communicate with people and tell your team what lane you want – before you lock in a character (e.g., say Top, Mid, or Bot). In addition, people will say “GLHF” which stands for “Good luck, have fun!” If you communicate well with your team and you are friendly, you can get honored by your fellow players (e.g., they can rate you as: friendly, helpful, and good teamwork). After the game, if you think someone did a good job, you can rate them positively, too. Also, League of Legends generally has pretty strict language requirements. If you are mean to your other teammates, you are likely to get reported and suspended. So, have fun and play nice! Experienced players may even help you out along the way if you come to the games with a positive attitude and communicate with your team.