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More moonkin and sealion shapeshift pictures

MMO-champion and others have started data-mining the Legion beta. This brings us lots of new pictures. It takes them a long time to go over every inch of a new game client, so they just started posting pictures of the new shapeshift forms. Below are a few of the views of the Tauren form. The colorings are still being worked out. Click on the links to see the full MMO-champion pictures (I cut a couple views from each so they weren’t so tiny on the blog).

Horde forms (without all the correct coloring)

Adriacraft also was able to capture some animated shots! (Horde horned moonkin models)

The Nigh Elf forms are also available (without all the correct coloring):

Animated Allianace-antlered moonkin forms By Adriacraft:

Sea Lion Form Updated

Posted in Beta Feedback, Legion, Moonkin Balance DPS, Uncategorized, Written By Lissanna
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The profession paradox

With garrisons set to be the crowning achievement of the Warlords of Draenor expansion, and professions being intricately tied to the success of the garrison feature, I thought we would know more about professions by now. How little we know about professions in WOD worries me, especially because of how much we know will change. Fansites such as Wowhead have been collecting information on the basics of professions, but I have still been struggling to figure out how all the pieces fit together. The biggest problem I’m having at this point is that the work order process in the garrison seems to not be taking into consideration the history of how people have chosen their professions. Professions that used to work together now instead compete for resources and garrison space, leading me to question whether I chose my primary professions poorly.

A tale of Tailoring and Enchanting

When I started my mage, I already had a jewelcrafter/miner (my druid), and an alchemist/herbalist (my shaman). So, I thought the obvious pairing for my mage would be tailoring and enchanting. Tailoring was incredibly helpful in generating resources for leveling up enchanting at the end of Cataclysm. Enchanting has been helpful in being able to disenchant gear that drops from my guild’s raids. However, other than helping me level enchanting, tailoring has done very little for me or my guild, other than providing me with cheaper bag upgrades and raid bonus enhancements. So, I have to make the tough choice of whether to keep tailoring for the next expansion.

Everything I’ve found out about the garrisons and work orders suggests that taking tailoring just to support enchanting is a bad idea for Warlords of Draenor. Here is why:

  • By having two primary professions, I need two small plots to support leveling the professions in WOD. However, I don’t get access to a second small plot until several levels into the leveling process. So, I have to choose one of two professions to start before the other. In addition, I only get three small plots total. So, it’s actually a disadvantage to have two crafting professions in WOD with all the changes.
  • Tailoring appears to require two garrison plots to be useful as a primary profession. Tailoring now relies on skins that come from animals only, and thus both the tailoring small plot and the barn medium plot appear to be required to be able to get enough animal skins to level tailoring. The trading post would also be helpful, too, for turning garrison resources into more fur. In addition, tailoring and leatherworking don’t appear to actually share materials, so skinning doesn’t seem to be a profession that is supposed to support tailoring (but I can’t even really tell that for sure from the guides).
  • The work orders for enchanting don’t interact with tailoring at all. Farming skins from animals to make items to disenchant is likely to actually use more resources and time than other methods of farming items to disenchant. Taking a gathering profession instead of tailoring would free up two garrison plots, speed up my profession leveling times, and confer other possible benefits along the way.
  • Update: I just went back to the enchanting hut, and now instead of taking ore, it’s taking dust from enchanting to complete the work orders. So, even with the method I’d been using for the last month or so leveling up my character, it’s still not finalized to the point where you can plan on what feeds into what. That’s what I get for hitting ‘post’ without checking in on the garrison plot for a few days.

Do I even need to have either tailoring or enchanting as a primary profession?

So, I’m left with questions over what I need tailoring for (very little to support my raiding if anyone else in my guild can make items from the tailoring raid patterns), whether the time to level tailoring is worth it (probably not, unless they replaced all humanoids in the world with beasts that drop skins), and what the point of all this even is.

With enchanting, if I made an enchanting hut in my garrison, I could still disenchant everything that I got from raids, without needing enchanting as a profession at all. So, the bigger question then becomes – what is the point of having crafting professions as our primary professions? Would it make sense for everyone just to pick up gathering professions (mining/herbing/skinning), and just feed resources into profession huts without having any primary crafting professions at all?

You no longer get raid bonuses from your primary professions, and all the crafting professions have their primary benefits given to you via the garrison huts whether you have that profession or not, so I can’t figure out what the point of having any primary crafting professions is at all right now. At the very least, I’m pretty sure having two primary crafting professions is to my own detriment. At this point, I’m trying to decide if I should get mining (to directly feed my enchanting), or if I should pick up herbalism instead to more quickly feed resources into an alchemy hut. Maybe dropping both enchanting and tailoring would be the smartest choice of all. With the new profession ‘catch up’ bonuses, the beginning of WOD seems like the perfect time to change all our profession choices. That is, until another expansion comes along and changes the entire system again, and we have to start all over.

Even having played in the beta, they haven’t had enough of the garrison and profession systems implemented for me to know what professions would be the best use of my time – whether staying the course on tailoring and enchanting would be a waste of time and money or not. As many raiders chose their professions based on the raid-related benefits (and having all of those benefits changing), this is really the time to be making decisions about what our professions should be. I just wish we had enough information for me to be able to make a better decision. That, then, becomes the problem. With it being easier to just start all over again on your professions, what profession choice is the right one? What benefits do we even get from all this extra profession leveling work?

Confusions, not conclusions

The new profession system in the garrisons are so confusing that I haven’t been able to level up any profession at all to test any of it out. The only thing I’ve ever done is turn raw materials into other types of raw materials via the work order system. I haven’t yet crafted anything at all. This late in the game, I really wish I could write about my plan for my professions, instead of writing about my uncertainty over how to even plan at all. With professions being central to everything we’re supposed to care about this expansion, I really wish we knew enough to be able to care about professions.

Posted in Beta Feedback, Warlords of Draenor, Written By Lissanna

Resto druid updates for Draenor

With the release of Warlords of Draenor just a few months away, I have started to receive a lot of questions about the state of druids, and especially resto druids. For people wondering about the current state of moonkin, you can read Cyous’ post on the Sentry Totem website. Cyous also has a post on the basics of how the new sine-wave Eclipse  works. For resto druid updates, the Sometimes a Tree blog has had fairly regular content updates recently.

I will likely still be maintaining my resto and leveling guides for Warlords of Draenor, but those are unlikely to be written until close to the release of the 6.0 patch, since Blizzard always changes things at the last minute.

What does the Resto Druid Toolset look like?

Overall, resto druid healing won’t realistically change all that much in Warlords of Draenor. So, if you enjoy resto druid healing now, you should enjoy it in Draenor. Resto druids are still primarily HOT healers, with some supporting direct heals. Our AOE healing toolset remains relatively unchanged. You will use tranquility, wild growth, rejuv, and shrooms as your main AOE spells. Our single-target toolset consists of lifebloom, healing touch, regrowth, and swiftmend.

A recap of the spells with major changes:

  • You will keep lifebloom on a tank. It now only has one stack, which means you don’t have to maintain the three stack anymore. Letting it fall off for the bloom may sometimes be worthwhile, since it doesn’t have the same ramp-up to maintain it.
  • Wild Growth now has a cast-time, instead of being instant. This does not, however, benefit from omen of clarity.
  • Wild Mushroom now only applies the Efflorescence ground effect, and no longer has a direct healing component. This expires after 30 seconds, and has a 30 second cooldown. We can no longer move or bloom the wild mushroom.
  • Tranquility‘s effect has been simplified. It does the main set of ticks without any additional HOT component. It should heal everyone in the raid.

Major stat changes:

  • Multi-strike causes your spell to have a chance to do additional damage or healing to your target. Our direct heals and HOTs can multi-strike, so resto druids can benefit from this stat. However, efflorescence won’t multi-strike.
  • You will still care more about mastery and haste than multi-strike or crit.
  • There are no more haste break-points for HOTs.
  • Versatility is a stat that provides a smaller benefit to multiple stats. This ends up being the worst of the resto druid stats.
  • Restoration druids get a 5% bonus to haste, as part of the new “attunement” bonuses.

Level 100 talents:

  • The level 100 talents are largely lackluster now, but Germination in particular is pretty good. I would suggest Germination as the best new player option of the three (extends rejuv’s duration by 3 seconds, and allows 2 rejuvs per person instead of 1).
  • I would avoid Rampant Growth, as this makes swiftmend consume your HOTs (and in most situations, this is almost always counterproductive). The trade-off of having no cooldown on swiftmend doesn’t seem a large enough benefit given that trying to maximize use of this talent will likely drain your mana. There may be specific situations where this is helpful, but that would likely be fight-specific.
  • Moment of Clarity allows more than one spell to benefit from the mana reduction of OOC, but only has a duration of 5 seconds (and starts from when the buff occurs, not when you first cast a relevant spell). This means that omen of clarity can sometimes fall off before you use it if it randomly procs at the wrong time in your healing rotation (omen of clarity traditionally only lets one spell benefit, but has a decently long time period for you to use that one spell). I have found it difficult to get off more than one spell that benefits from OOC when playing with this talent, so it will likely only be beneficial at high levels of haste for people who are good at maximizing the benefits. So, this may work as an advanced talent for players, but is likely to be more of a penalty than a help for newer resto druids.
Posted in Beta Feedback, Restoration Healing Trees, Written By Lissanna

Improvements for guild perk system in Warlords

The guild leveling system was originally meant to be a reward for guilds. People who worked together got rewards. For the first ~6 months, this guild leveling system was awesome. After a year, or two, things went terribly wrong.

The level 25 elephant in the room.

However, in recent years, the guild leveling system, as well as the cash flow perk, has been discouraging people from making new guilds. This has been particularly problematic as it has directly contributed to the decline in the number of people willing to start new raiding guilds, and thus the decline of the raiding population that helped keep the social element of the game intact. Even for social guilds, people only trusted level 25 guilds to have their best interests in mind.

Instead, many people starting guilds have been doing it for the purpose of predatory behavior. That is, someone would start a guild and then spam invites to any new player who made a character on the server. Once people were in the guild, they would be abused for leveling purposes, and then kicked from the guild as soon as the guild hit level 25. Then, that guild could be sold to the highest bidder. Since people couldn’t start new raiding guilds unless they bought a level 25 guild, that created a market for people who abused new players for the purpose of leveling and selling guilds.

The cash flow perk was also problematic in that it earned money for the guild leader along the way, which then was not shared with the rest of the members in a predatory leveling guild. In most real guilds, this cash flow perk did not come anywhere near covering the costs associated with raiding and the repair feature. So, the cash flow perk was able to be abused by predatory guilds (e.g., to a single person who wasn’t giving anything back to the guild members), but wasn’t providing any substantial bonus to real guilds who were using the money (e.g., guild leadership that used the money to supply the guild with needed resources).

Since most new guilds were assumed to be predatory (even when someone actually had good intentions), most good players would not join a guild that was below level 25. This meant that as a new guild officer, you couldn’t recruit quality players, and you burned out of leadership before you even got started. Since all good guilds were level 25, the way to know that the guild was good was to refuse to join any guild that wasn’t at max level. Thus, the cycle of needing to buy level 25 guilds to show legitimacy has been a huge problem that Blizzard has largely ignored. That is, until today.

Social groups will always die and fade if given enough time. So, guilds were always going to fold after their leaders got tired. The leaders were always going to get tired. The problem with guild leveling is that it created a barrier for entry for new guilds and new leaders. That slowed down the creation of new guilds to a much slower speed than guilds were folding, and led to a cascade of other related problems that make guild leadership unappealing to new players. Prior to Cataclysm, there were always new guilds to replace the ones that went away, but that ended with the guild leveling barrier of entry.

The solution to the guild problem.

Blizzard has announced that they are removing the guild leveling system from the game. Every guild in the game will be treated as though they are level 25. If you are in a guild, you get all the benefits of being in the guild without having to level the guild.

They are also removing the problematic cash flow perk. Instead of guilds making money from the cash flow perk, they are putting epic BOEs back into raiding dungeons for guilds to be able to sell. This was the primary way my guild funded all of our repairs and materials prior to Siege of Orgrimmar removing epic BOEs.

Guilds will still have fun bonuses in Warlords.

With the worry about the changes, there are several important things to keep in mind:

  • There will still be the basic perks that came from being in a guild. Things that people really liked, they will still mostly get (though there will be fewer individual perks in the perk list – combining things reduces confusion and “bloat”). For level 25 guilds, nothing important really changes with what they announced.
  • There will still be guild achievements. With all the talk of removing the leveling system, achievements are still something really important that were of benefit to real guilds (and weren’t all that helpful to predatory guilds). Achievements have been updated for guilds continuously every expansion, and are the main ways that all the level 25 guilds differentiate themselves anyway.
  • Purchasing guild bank tabs is still going to require resources, thus there will still be plenty of opportunities to feel like your new guild is progressing in working together to accomplish goals.
  • Without the cash flow perk, it will be easier to get shared guild resources in ways that require working together and doing normal guild behavior (e.g., actually running instances or raids as a team).  Additionally, getting people to donate shared resources will be easier without people thinking the cash flow perk is actually doing something  (when in reality, it never was).
  • People who want to start new raiding or social guilds no longer have to give money to people selling pre-leveled guilds. Instead, we go back to the days when people who wanted to start a new guild had the resources available for them to do so. Thus, people can start new raid teams without being at such a huge disadvantage. The guild perks are now bonuses, rather than a system that punishes new players.
  • If people do only the dungeon and scenario guild challenges, your guild can get around 5,500 gold per week. This number increases if you do any of the other perks, with several thousand more gold available from the more difficult challenges (e.g., battlegrounds, challenge modes, and raids). Seeing as how my guild only got 600 from the cash flow perk (excluding guild challenges), convincing our guild members to complete the challenges is a better source of income than the cash flow perk ever was. You have to subtract your guild challenge total from the perk UI because the game adds those values together.

This is a change that should have positive impacts on the game. The guild level shackles were going to cause a huge problem when people needed to make new guilds in Warlords of Draenor. Now, those shackles have been removed – making way for an era of new guilds. While it may take a long time for the fear of predatory guilds to fade. It is normal for old guild leadership to burn out, but it’s not normal for potential new leaders to be scared away from trying. In time, trying to be a new guild leader may be seen as a positive thing in the community, instead of a negative. As old guild leaders burn out, lets hope that new people can now be encouraged to try to take up the mantle of leadership. It’s still a lot of work to be a leader, but without Bizzard tying our hands behind our backs, it’s now a function of the leader’s effort and skills at leading to make new guilds a success. Go forth and make friends.

Posted in Beta Feedback, Guild Leadership, Warlords of Draenor, Written By Lissanna


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